Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Saturday, February 24, 2018

Stem cell study may result in stronger muscles in old age

You will need this so ask your doctor for followup to get this for you.
https://www.alphagalileo.org/ViewItem.aspx?ItemId=183930&CultureCode=en

23 February 2018 Karolinska Institutet

As we grow older, our muscular function declines. A new study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows how an unexpectedly high number of mutations in the stem cells of muscles impair cell regeneration. This discovery may result in new medication to build stronger muscles even when in old age. The study is published in Nature Communications.

It has already been established that natural ageing impairs the function of our skeletal muscles. We also know that the number and the activity of the muscles’ stem cells decline with age. However, the reasons for this has not been fully understood. In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have investigated the number of mutations that accumulate in the muscle's stem cells (satellite cells).

“What is most surprising is the high number of mutations. We have seen how a healthy 70-year-old has accumulated more than 1,000 mutations in each stem cell in the muscle, and that these mutations are not random but there are certain regions that are better protected,” explains Maria Eriksson, Professor at the Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at Karolinska Institutet.

The mutations occur during natural cell division, and the regions that are protected are those that are important for the function or survival of the cells. Nonetheless, the researchers were able to identify that this protection declines with age.

“We can demonstrate that this protection diminishes the older you become, indicating an impairment in the cell's capacity to repair their DNA. And this is something we should be able to influence with new drugs,” explains Maria Eriksson.

The researchers have benefited from new methods to complete the study. The study was performed using single stem cells cultivated to provide sufficient DNA for whole genome sequencing.

“We achieved this in the skeletal muscle tissue, which is absolutely unique. We have also found that there is very little overlap of mutations, despite the cells being located close to each other, representing an extremely complex mutational burden,” explains the study's first author, Irene Franco, Postdoc in Maria Eriksson’s research group.

The researchers will now continue their work to investigate whether physical exercise can affect the number of accumulated mutations. Is it true that physical exercise from a young age clears out cells with many mutations, or does it result in the generation of a higher number of such cells?

“We aim to discover whether it is possible to individually influence the burden of mutations. Our results may be beneficial for the development of exercise programmes, particularly those designed for an ageing population,” explains Maria Eriksson.

The researchers gained access to the muscle tissue used in the study via a close collaboration with clinical researchers, including Helene Fischer at the Unit for Clinical Physiology at Karolinska University Hospital.

The study has been a cooperative project between researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab), Uppsala University, Linköping University and Stockholm University, in addition to several affiliated institutes in Italy.

The research is financed by the Swedish Research Council, CIMED (Centre for Innovative Medicine), the David and Astrid Hagelén Foundation, the Swedish Society of Medicine, the Gun and Bertil Stohnes Foundation, the Osterman Foundation, the Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, Wallenberg Advanced Bioinformatics Infrastructure and the EU Commission funding programme, Marie Skłodowska-Curie.


Attached files

  • Irene Franco, Postdoc, and Maria Eriksson, Professor, Karolinska Institutet. Photo: Ulf Sirborn


Wearable tech aids stroke patients

Maybe with this your doctor and therapists could finally get exact diagnosis of your movement disabilities. And use that to correlate exact stroke rehab protocols that fix those disabilities. Pie in the sky I know but someone has to put goals out there. Your stroke medical professionals are doing nothing about goals to 100% recovery.  You do want 100% recovery, don't you? And you've asked your doctor for protocols to get there? Haven't you? Did your doctor ask if you were crazy wanting 100% recovery? Or crazy just for asking?
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-43146117














Media captionWearable tech could help stroke patients

Scientists in the US are developing wearable sensors to speed up the recovery of stroke patients.
The sensors are able to send information to doctors continuously.
The team developing the system says it could allow therapists to more closely monitor the effectiveness of their care.
Details of the study were released at the recent annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Texas.
Lizzy McAninch had a stroke two years ago. She could not move or speak or swallow for several weeks.
Lizzy is testing out wearable sensors that might speed her recovery.
They look like small white sticking plasters, but they send information wirelessly to her medical team.
She is a doctor herself and can see how they could help her.





Sensor Image copyright Shirley Ryan AbilityLab
Image caption They look like small sticking plasters

"This technology to put sensors on the body to assess which muscle groups work or not can really pinpoint the areas affected by the stroke and can target therapies to specifically improve those issues," she told BBC News.
The sensors continue to send back readings even after she has finished her exercises. This means that her therapist Kristen Hohl, from the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab in Chicago, can monitor her progress at home.
"As a therapist, I think about what my patients are doing at home. Are they able to carry through the recommendations I'm giving them as a therapist to do more? Do we see that they are walking more or do we see them engaging in conversations?
"Those are the types of things that I can get feedback from the sensors where currently I have to rely on what they tell me they have done."





Tablet Image copyright Shirley Ryan AbilityLab
Image caption The team is gathering large amounts of data

The challenge for the scientists was to pack a lot of electronics on to a small flexible material and still make it comfortable for the patient to wear for a long time.
"It is almost mechanically imperceptible to the patient who is wearing the device," according to John Rogers, of Northwestern University in Chicago, who developed the sensors.
"And you can embed all sorts of advanced sensor functionality, microprocessor computing capability, power supplies and WiFi into this very unusual platform, and that is the uniqueness of what we do."
By the end of this year, the research team will have more information than ever before on stroke recovery. The scientists believe that their study could transform the way patients are treated in the future.